Sustainable Chippendale

A Sustainable Suburb In the Making

Sustainable Chippendale is a community initiative setup to support the Sustainable Streets and Community Plan in Chippendale. If you are passionate about sustainability we'd love you to join us in getting behind this ground breaking project to establish a practical model for sustainable inner city living in Sydney.

New garden angels

Last week we got some new lovely and enthusiastic neighbours putting their hands up to help take care of our gardens! Our gardens can't survive without amazing people like these two, so a big thank you to them! See what they have been up to:

Tanaya taking care of a compost bin

Tanaya taking care of a compost bin

Tanaya went out with Michael Mobbs and put compost and mulch on the fruit trees on the southern side of Myrtle st between Pine and Shepherd and took out about half of the compost from the rotating compost bin outside 58 Myrtle st.

While they took out compost from it someone neither of us knew walked up and emptied a bucket of food waste into the bin; so they introduced themselves and shared the pleasure of turning food waste into healthy compost for our road gardens! That is what it is all about!

Tanaya and Vince live in units in Dangar place and took home a glass jar with some mung beans in it to grow so that’s a little bit of food she can grow in their unit! It doesn't matter how small your place is, there is always a way to grow some food, which is great for dinner and will also eventually help grow our little community of bees, lady bugs, etc, all essential for our environment!

Tanaya and Vince have also put their hands up to write some articles for our website, so you will be hearing more from them soon! 

Vince getting papayas from the tree on Myrtle st

Vince getting papayas from the tree on Myrtle st

Students go road gardening

We have had the pleasure to have Kathrin, Bianca and Christina back helping take care of our gardens for their Duke of Edinburgh's award and here is what they had to say about their experience:

"Our findings at the Chippendale Sustainable Garden        

30/4/16

By Kathrin Germanos, Bianca Bader and Christina Gadalla

 As part of our Duke of Ed requirement for service to the community we once again partook in volunteering at the Chippendale Gardens. The main thing which we got out of today is “ not to waste” and how we are easily able to minimise our waste as things which we often don’t realise, can actually be re used in new and different ways. In addition, we also learnt how to prune, and the importance of mulch especially during Autumn. 

The session started off with us trying some mung beans, which we then learnt how to grow from seeds. This was particularly interesting as during the colder months it is harder for plants to grow and thus harder to grow food. The mung bean however is one which we learn could be grown by ourselves to produce food. Furthermore, it is also rich in vitamins and versatile thus can be added to provide extra health benefits to a range of means. Michael’s suggestion being a vegetable slice or salad. 

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 Next, we discovered another use of oyster shells, which can be added to compost tea, too improve the quality of the compost. We smashed them up using hammers then added them to the tea and went to pour this onto the garden. This tea is made up of a specific plant and then is left to ferment for a couple of days until it becomes aerobic and is rich is nitrogen ( vital for plant survival). This mixture although was quite stinky, was going to help the plants root systems grow during these months. Especially the root system since above ground level doesn’t usually grow so well during this time. 

The fertiliser was then covered in mulch which was raked up straight from the chicken coop. A mixture of chicken excrement, wormsand straw Michael described it as “gold”. This was then placed once again where we had just put the fertiliser. Around the plants – the main area where the roots extend too. 

 As for skills, we learnt how to use secateurs safely as this is a vital tool used for pruning. Pruning must be done to help the plants healthy as it opens up the plants and allows for more sunlight and air to pass through the middle of the plant. It also helps to reduce sickness and competition on branches as then the plant doesn’t have to supply nutrients to both branches- as consequently both will become weaker. It is much better to cut off the weaker one so the stronger one can become stronger. This overall increases the plants fruit production as well as survival rate. 

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 We were able to take turns pruning a couple of plants, which we then covered in straw ( at the base of the plant ). This helps it during Autumn and Winter as it gets colder and it acts as a sort of blanket for the plants. 

 Overall we had a very valuable educational experience, which although at some stages may have been a little challenging, was eye opening. We learnt that even the smallest things can make a difference and that most ordinary things can be saved as re used to stop them from going to landfill. We were able to use these new found skills throughout the day and hopefully are able to harness them for better use in the future. "

Very special volunteers

On the 19/March/2016 we had a visit from Kathrin, Bianca and Christina from Meriden School. The girls are working towards they Duke of Edinburgh Award and decided to volunteer right here with us in Chippendale! Aren't we lucky? 

Plants kindly donated by the council

Plants kindly donated by the council

We also had Sarah who is doing her PHd from RMIT University on "life in sustainable places" coming to garden with us.

They worked really hard to help us plant a bunch of new plants we got given by the Council, we also did some prunning and mulching. Below you can see some pictures of our lovely morning!

Thank you so much girls for giving us your time to make our streets that much nicer!

Organic Art 'Second Life' By Ratih Luhur

The installation 'Second Life' is created to reflect the following characteristics of Myrtle St & Sustainable Chippendale:

1. Sustainability - created with organic and recycled materials collected from the streets

2. Our street as our living room - creation of a living room scene on the street

3. Edible / vegetable garden - planted with exotic microgreens, specially selected for variety of organic colours and textures. Rocket emeralds on the chair, amaranth red garnets on the hessian shawl, mung bean and peas in the planter basket

4. Multicultural heritage of the local residents- featuring a photo of Tayrona Park, Colombia by Maria Prada resident of 8 Myrtle St. 

The installation is part of my entry requirement to Master of Fine Arts degree in Public Art and New Artistic Strategies at the Bauhaus University of Weimar, Germany http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/university/start/

Internationally, the Bauhaus is known as one of the most influential currents in modernism with a profound influence in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography.

Artist CV
Ratih Luhur graduated as BSc (Arch) from the University of Sydney in 1990. She completed Master of Visual Arts (Multi Media) with honours from Sydney College of the Arts in 2000 achieving High Distinction in all subjects. Ratih's design and artistic flare was awarded 2 of the 9 awards in William Van Alen Memorial Prize international competition by NIAE New York. Internationally, Ratih is also known as a spiritual healing practitioner and mentor. http://www.ratihluhur.com

Her work reflects her refined artistic style with sensitive spiritual and cultural awareness.

Ratih's organic Art

Second Life
The installation is created to reflect the following characteristics of Myrtle St & Sustainable Chippendale:
1. Sustainability - created with organic and recycled materials collected from the streets
2. Our street as our living room - creation of a living room scene on the street
3. Edible / vegetable garden - planted with exotic microgreens, specially selected for variety of organic colours and textures. Rocket emeralds on the chair, amaranth red garnets on the hessian shawl, mung bean and peas in the planter basket
4. Multicultural heritage of the local residents- featuring a photo of Tayrona Park, Colombia by Maria Prada resident of 8 Myrtle St. 
 
The installation is part of my entry requirement to Master of Fine Arts degree in Public Art and New Artistic Strategies at the Bauhaus University of Weimar, Germany http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/university/start/
Internationally, the Bauhaus is known as one of the most influential currents in modernism with a profound influence in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography.
 
Artist CV
Ratih Luhur graduated as BSc (Arch) from the University of Sydney in 1990. She completed Master of Visual Arts (Multi Media) with honours from Sydney College of the Arts in 2000 achieving High Distinction in all subjects. Ratih's design and artistic flare was awarded 2 of the 9 awards in William Van Alen Memorial Prize international competition by NIAE New York. Internationally, Ratih is also known as a spiritual healing practitioner and mentor. http://www.ratihluhur.com
Her work reflects her refined artistic style with sensitive spiritual and cultural awareness.
 

Some great pics from Maria @ www.mariapradaphotography.com of Ratih's organic Art in front of her house. Big thanks Ratih for making the street even more lovely.  

Big Thanks To Our Newest Gardeners

  • Maria is a photographer and lives at 8 Myrtle st. Maria is now looking after the yellow planter bed and citrus and other plants on the corner of Myrtle and City Rd.
  • Ratih is an Artist who will be doing some sculptures in our road gardens and work with Maria and her neighbours to scope the sculpture

New Compost Bin for Shepherd St

Our awesome Sean Foley bought a new tumbler compost bin of 300 litres and put it in place on Shepherd St on Saturday 23 May.

It has four screws so will probably stop vandals putting in bottles and rubbish.  

It needs a couple of signs that Alexis made to go on it but it's about a quarter full and we have sealed off the other compost bin nearby so it should fill up soon.  We'll remove the other compost bins and mover over to the tumbler bins as they are more vandal proof and easier to manage.

Thank you so much Sean!

New Road Garden Library

This week we got our little road garden library rebuilt by some of our lovely neighbours, including the clever children who started the library! Thanks guys!

 

 This one is bigger and better and it was built using recyled hard wood timber from a timber pallet provided by Toby's Estate. Thanks Toby's! 

Here are some pics of Mick, Michael and the kids busy at work!

 

Where? The Library is at the corner of Pine st and Myrtle st and is for everyone! 

Who can use it? Everyone!! This is a community initiative, run by our local children!

How does it work? You put in a book you are finished with and you take out one you would like to read! Simple like that!